25 Ways to Spend Your Summer

Yes, it’s April and some of us in parts of the U.S. and Canada are still lacing up winter boots each morning, but believe it or notsummer is near.

If you are en-route to college next fall, by May 1 you will have finished with any letters of continued interest, admission decision appeals, and decided which college you will attend in the fall of 2018.

Whether you are planning to get a head start on your college applications, get some work experience, or simply take it easy, we’ve got you covered.

Here are our suggestions for how to spend your summer:

Learn something new
  1. Study a language.
  2. Learn to code.
  3. Ask the advice of elderly people.
  4. Read (partially for the book lists you will have to write for college apps, but mostly for pleasure!)
  5. Take a free online course at one of the Ivy League schools, such as at Harvard X or Yale Open Courses.
Learn something new (about yourself)
  1. Travel alone.
  2. Go on a meditation retreat.
  3. Grow a garden.
  4. Pick up journaling.
  5. Create something (Write a play, shoot a film, build a sculpture etc.)
Grow professionally
  1. Get a summer job in any field.
  2. Volunteer or intern in a field you hope to work in.
  3. Start an organization or business.
  4. Make a LinkedIn profile.
  5. Reach out to someone who is working your dream job (or even just a job you are simply interesting in). Call/email them. You may be surprised how many responses you get!
Catch a break
  1. Do nothing. (We’ll explain.)
  2. Ride your bike (or skateboard, longboard, surfboard, etc.)
  3. Go on a food tour around the city (If you live in a big city, you could formally sign up. If there are no organized food tours around where you live, create your own!)
  4. Go hiking.
  5. DO NOTHING.
Enact change
  1. Join an organization that supports a cause you care about, whether that be animal welfare, the environment, human rights etc.
  2. Start change from within. Take this time to educate yourself about your own biases. Consider taking an implicit bias assessment. Reflect on how your implicit biases shape your interactions with other people.
  3. Call your political representatives and/or attend town hall meetings.
  4. Sit in on a youth panel.
  5. Pick a public park. Grab some garbage bags. Clean up said park.

Over the next few months, we will be following up with blog posts going a little more in depth over some of the points on this list.

Need help securing an internship? Book recommendations? Wondering what a ‘meditation retreat’ is? Let us know in the comments which suggestions you would like to hear more about!

 

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